mapletheleonberger:

…what have I done?

More importantly … there’s a corgi in the background! mapletheleonberger:

…what have I done?

More importantly … there’s a corgi in the background! mapletheleonberger:

…what have I done?

More importantly … there’s a corgi in the background! mapletheleonberger:

…what have I done?

More importantly … there’s a corgi in the background!

mapletheleonberger:

…what have I done?

More importantly … there’s a corgi in the background!

(via soderboner)

Just made the mistake of looking at the comments under a vid Mark McMorris posted on Insta. MY EYES!

humansofnewyork:

"I started working in the fields when I was five. After that, I worked construction for thirty years. Eight years ago, I was between jobs and I wanted to do something useful, so I started going to school. It took me 8 years to get through middle school, because I could only go to classes when work was slow, but I finished with a 9.3 out of 10. Now I’m moving on to high school. The toughest part is Algebra."

(Mexico City, Mexico)

boywithoutacrown:

dr0ptheheart:

This is my face. I am not happy. I am not good. I am bad. I’m a liar and a fake, I’m in love with someone who will never love me back and I am not good enough. I am worthless. I am sad. I am depressed, I do nothing good for anyone. I want to die because i am not useful in this world. I beg for something to take my life every night. Because I need to die. I am fucked up in side, and out.

This is your face. You are a good person. You are worth more than what he makes you feel like. Please stop being so hard on yourself. I know it is difficult now to see the beauty that lies in you, the beauty you hold after he’s made you feel this way but please, trust me, you are a good person.

This is your face. Please take care of yourself. There’s only one you and you’re worth it.

chrisburkard:

Some Mountains demand your respect. Mt Assiniboine is one of those mountains.

Smoke filled the sky this morning from nearby Forrest fires and gave the light an incredible soft texture as the sun rose. The sky stayed a vibrant blue while the ground difused into a sepia tone of fall color.

Shot with @sony A6000 16-70mm F4 , circ-polarizer (at canada )

The rumours are now confirmed. Some serious riders on the Nike roster - Sage, Louie, Scotty, Spencer, etc. Hope they get some new sponsorship.

“To translate it from Canadian into American terms, it is as if someone had found, in a single moment, the hull of the Titanic, the solution to the mystery of the lost colony at Roanoke, the original flag of ‘The Star-Spangled Banner,’ and the menu for the Donner Party’s last meal.”
Adam Gopnik on the finding of the Franklin ship. (via newyorker)

(via newyorker)

theyoutubewriter:

thewriting-banshee:

I can not fathom to you how annoyingly frustrated I am by Sam Peppers actions; when you dig yourself a hole and find you’re to blame, the mature thing to do is accept and own up to your actions.
Not only has this boy lied further into protecting his image and his self, he has made the situation worse by opening his mouth; he has now threatened some one who has had the courage to show the truth.
We have had numerous amounts of evidence where people have shun the light onto Sam Pepper’s true self and I find it very difficult to believe that he will find a way out of this situation.

why the hell are these tweets not covering my entire dash
fix. that.
theyoutubewriter:

thewriting-banshee:

I can not fathom to you how annoyingly frustrated I am by Sam Peppers actions; when you dig yourself a hole and find you’re to blame, the mature thing to do is accept and own up to your actions.
Not only has this boy lied further into protecting his image and his self, he has made the situation worse by opening his mouth; he has now threatened some one who has had the courage to show the truth.
We have had numerous amounts of evidence where people have shun the light onto Sam Pepper’s true self and I find it very difficult to believe that he will find a way out of this situation.

why the hell are these tweets not covering my entire dash
fix. that.
theyoutubewriter:

thewriting-banshee:

I can not fathom to you how annoyingly frustrated I am by Sam Peppers actions; when you dig yourself a hole and find you’re to blame, the mature thing to do is accept and own up to your actions.
Not only has this boy lied further into protecting his image and his self, he has made the situation worse by opening his mouth; he has now threatened some one who has had the courage to show the truth.
We have had numerous amounts of evidence where people have shun the light onto Sam Pepper’s true self and I find it very difficult to believe that he will find a way out of this situation.

why the hell are these tweets not covering my entire dash
fix. that.

theyoutubewriter:

thewriting-banshee:

I can not fathom to you how annoyingly frustrated I am by Sam Peppers actions; when you dig yourself a hole and find you’re to blame, the mature thing to do is accept and own up to your actions.

Not only has this boy lied further into protecting his image and his self, he has made the situation worse by opening his mouth; he has now threatened some one who has had the courage to show the truth.

We have had numerous amounts of evidence where people have shun the light onto Sam Pepper’s true self and I find it very difficult to believe that he will find a way out of this situation.

why the hell are these tweets not covering my entire dash

fix. that.

(via britishmenaremyweakness)

yagazieemezi:

This past summer an exhibition nearly 60 years in the making put the fashionable gents of Jamaican subculture known as ‘Rudeboys’ front and center in an exhibition at Somerset House called “Return of the Rudeboy”. In 1960s Jamaica, “rudeboys” represented rebellious youth angry at unemployment and disenfranchisement (poverty, poor housing, lack of food) happening in Jamaican shantytowns. They were men sharply dressed in pork pie hats, mohair suits, freshly polished brogues, children of the ska music scene who were known for mincing words with law enforcement and disrupting through means of violence.
The Jamaican subculture found a subsequent home in England in the 1970s and 1980s, and, fast-forwarding a few decades, its cool has deepened in modern day England. The rudeboys (and gals) photographer Dean Chalkey’s ‘Return of the Rudeboy’ exhibition–curated by stylist and creative director Harris Eliott–reflect a modern rudeboy whose influence is less about disrupting and more about influencing music, fashion, art, technology and business. The term rudeboy has grown from being a slang term exclusive to one sect, to encompassing a lifestyle that is more inclusive to both men and women. Projecting ones individuality through style and attitude is the cornerstone. Rudeboys today in a sense have taken their style cues from their predecessors of cool, and have become the leading creatives and entrepreneurs.(via Washington Post)
All Photos by Dean Chalkey/Somerset House
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

I knew a shit tonne of ‘rude boys’ in my youth and out of those photos - the only guy close enough to a legit ‘rude boy’ is the third photo down … but he should really swap his fedora for a pork pie. The rest are just insanely smartly dressed gentlemen who look so fine (so does mister third shot). yagazieemezi:

This past summer an exhibition nearly 60 years in the making put the fashionable gents of Jamaican subculture known as ‘Rudeboys’ front and center in an exhibition at Somerset House called “Return of the Rudeboy”. In 1960s Jamaica, “rudeboys” represented rebellious youth angry at unemployment and disenfranchisement (poverty, poor housing, lack of food) happening in Jamaican shantytowns. They were men sharply dressed in pork pie hats, mohair suits, freshly polished brogues, children of the ska music scene who were known for mincing words with law enforcement and disrupting through means of violence.
The Jamaican subculture found a subsequent home in England in the 1970s and 1980s, and, fast-forwarding a few decades, its cool has deepened in modern day England. The rudeboys (and gals) photographer Dean Chalkey’s ‘Return of the Rudeboy’ exhibition–curated by stylist and creative director Harris Eliott–reflect a modern rudeboy whose influence is less about disrupting and more about influencing music, fashion, art, technology and business. The term rudeboy has grown from being a slang term exclusive to one sect, to encompassing a lifestyle that is more inclusive to both men and women. Projecting ones individuality through style and attitude is the cornerstone. Rudeboys today in a sense have taken their style cues from their predecessors of cool, and have become the leading creatives and entrepreneurs.(via Washington Post)
All Photos by Dean Chalkey/Somerset House
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

I knew a shit tonne of ‘rude boys’ in my youth and out of those photos - the only guy close enough to a legit ‘rude boy’ is the third photo down … but he should really swap his fedora for a pork pie. The rest are just insanely smartly dressed gentlemen who look so fine (so does mister third shot). yagazieemezi:

This past summer an exhibition nearly 60 years in the making put the fashionable gents of Jamaican subculture known as ‘Rudeboys’ front and center in an exhibition at Somerset House called “Return of the Rudeboy”. In 1960s Jamaica, “rudeboys” represented rebellious youth angry at unemployment and disenfranchisement (poverty, poor housing, lack of food) happening in Jamaican shantytowns. They were men sharply dressed in pork pie hats, mohair suits, freshly polished brogues, children of the ska music scene who were known for mincing words with law enforcement and disrupting through means of violence.
The Jamaican subculture found a subsequent home in England in the 1970s and 1980s, and, fast-forwarding a few decades, its cool has deepened in modern day England. The rudeboys (and gals) photographer Dean Chalkey’s ‘Return of the Rudeboy’ exhibition–curated by stylist and creative director Harris Eliott–reflect a modern rudeboy whose influence is less about disrupting and more about influencing music, fashion, art, technology and business. The term rudeboy has grown from being a slang term exclusive to one sect, to encompassing a lifestyle that is more inclusive to both men and women. Projecting ones individuality through style and attitude is the cornerstone. Rudeboys today in a sense have taken their style cues from their predecessors of cool, and have become the leading creatives and entrepreneurs.(via Washington Post)
All Photos by Dean Chalkey/Somerset House
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

I knew a shit tonne of ‘rude boys’ in my youth and out of those photos - the only guy close enough to a legit ‘rude boy’ is the third photo down … but he should really swap his fedora for a pork pie. The rest are just insanely smartly dressed gentlemen who look so fine (so does mister third shot). yagazieemezi:

This past summer an exhibition nearly 60 years in the making put the fashionable gents of Jamaican subculture known as ‘Rudeboys’ front and center in an exhibition at Somerset House called “Return of the Rudeboy”. In 1960s Jamaica, “rudeboys” represented rebellious youth angry at unemployment and disenfranchisement (poverty, poor housing, lack of food) happening in Jamaican shantytowns. They were men sharply dressed in pork pie hats, mohair suits, freshly polished brogues, children of the ska music scene who were known for mincing words with law enforcement and disrupting through means of violence.
The Jamaican subculture found a subsequent home in England in the 1970s and 1980s, and, fast-forwarding a few decades, its cool has deepened in modern day England. The rudeboys (and gals) photographer Dean Chalkey’s ‘Return of the Rudeboy’ exhibition–curated by stylist and creative director Harris Eliott–reflect a modern rudeboy whose influence is less about disrupting and more about influencing music, fashion, art, technology and business. The term rudeboy has grown from being a slang term exclusive to one sect, to encompassing a lifestyle that is more inclusive to both men and women. Projecting ones individuality through style and attitude is the cornerstone. Rudeboys today in a sense have taken their style cues from their predecessors of cool, and have become the leading creatives and entrepreneurs.(via Washington Post)
All Photos by Dean Chalkey/Somerset House
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

I knew a shit tonne of ‘rude boys’ in my youth and out of those photos - the only guy close enough to a legit ‘rude boy’ is the third photo down … but he should really swap his fedora for a pork pie. The rest are just insanely smartly dressed gentlemen who look so fine (so does mister third shot). yagazieemezi:

This past summer an exhibition nearly 60 years in the making put the fashionable gents of Jamaican subculture known as ‘Rudeboys’ front and center in an exhibition at Somerset House called “Return of the Rudeboy”. In 1960s Jamaica, “rudeboys” represented rebellious youth angry at unemployment and disenfranchisement (poverty, poor housing, lack of food) happening in Jamaican shantytowns. They were men sharply dressed in pork pie hats, mohair suits, freshly polished brogues, children of the ska music scene who were known for mincing words with law enforcement and disrupting through means of violence.
The Jamaican subculture found a subsequent home in England in the 1970s and 1980s, and, fast-forwarding a few decades, its cool has deepened in modern day England. The rudeboys (and gals) photographer Dean Chalkey’s ‘Return of the Rudeboy’ exhibition–curated by stylist and creative director Harris Eliott–reflect a modern rudeboy whose influence is less about disrupting and more about influencing music, fashion, art, technology and business. The term rudeboy has grown from being a slang term exclusive to one sect, to encompassing a lifestyle that is more inclusive to both men and women. Projecting ones individuality through style and attitude is the cornerstone. Rudeboys today in a sense have taken their style cues from their predecessors of cool, and have become the leading creatives and entrepreneurs.(via Washington Post)
All Photos by Dean Chalkey/Somerset House
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

I knew a shit tonne of ‘rude boys’ in my youth and out of those photos - the only guy close enough to a legit ‘rude boy’ is the third photo down … but he should really swap his fedora for a pork pie. The rest are just insanely smartly dressed gentlemen who look so fine (so does mister third shot). yagazieemezi:

This past summer an exhibition nearly 60 years in the making put the fashionable gents of Jamaican subculture known as ‘Rudeboys’ front and center in an exhibition at Somerset House called “Return of the Rudeboy”. In 1960s Jamaica, “rudeboys” represented rebellious youth angry at unemployment and disenfranchisement (poverty, poor housing, lack of food) happening in Jamaican shantytowns. They were men sharply dressed in pork pie hats, mohair suits, freshly polished brogues, children of the ska music scene who were known for mincing words with law enforcement and disrupting through means of violence.
The Jamaican subculture found a subsequent home in England in the 1970s and 1980s, and, fast-forwarding a few decades, its cool has deepened in modern day England. The rudeboys (and gals) photographer Dean Chalkey’s ‘Return of the Rudeboy’ exhibition–curated by stylist and creative director Harris Eliott–reflect a modern rudeboy whose influence is less about disrupting and more about influencing music, fashion, art, technology and business. The term rudeboy has grown from being a slang term exclusive to one sect, to encompassing a lifestyle that is more inclusive to both men and women. Projecting ones individuality through style and attitude is the cornerstone. Rudeboys today in a sense have taken their style cues from their predecessors of cool, and have become the leading creatives and entrepreneurs.(via Washington Post)
All Photos by Dean Chalkey/Somerset House
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

I knew a shit tonne of ‘rude boys’ in my youth and out of those photos - the only guy close enough to a legit ‘rude boy’ is the third photo down … but he should really swap his fedora for a pork pie. The rest are just insanely smartly dressed gentlemen who look so fine (so does mister third shot). yagazieemezi:

This past summer an exhibition nearly 60 years in the making put the fashionable gents of Jamaican subculture known as ‘Rudeboys’ front and center in an exhibition at Somerset House called “Return of the Rudeboy”. In 1960s Jamaica, “rudeboys” represented rebellious youth angry at unemployment and disenfranchisement (poverty, poor housing, lack of food) happening in Jamaican shantytowns. They were men sharply dressed in pork pie hats, mohair suits, freshly polished brogues, children of the ska music scene who were known for mincing words with law enforcement and disrupting through means of violence.
The Jamaican subculture found a subsequent home in England in the 1970s and 1980s, and, fast-forwarding a few decades, its cool has deepened in modern day England. The rudeboys (and gals) photographer Dean Chalkey’s ‘Return of the Rudeboy’ exhibition–curated by stylist and creative director Harris Eliott–reflect a modern rudeboy whose influence is less about disrupting and more about influencing music, fashion, art, technology and business. The term rudeboy has grown from being a slang term exclusive to one sect, to encompassing a lifestyle that is more inclusive to both men and women. Projecting ones individuality through style and attitude is the cornerstone. Rudeboys today in a sense have taken their style cues from their predecessors of cool, and have become the leading creatives and entrepreneurs.(via Washington Post)
All Photos by Dean Chalkey/Somerset House
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

I knew a shit tonne of ‘rude boys’ in my youth and out of those photos - the only guy close enough to a legit ‘rude boy’ is the third photo down … but he should really swap his fedora for a pork pie. The rest are just insanely smartly dressed gentlemen who look so fine (so does mister third shot).

yagazieemezi:

This past summer an exhibition nearly 60 years in the making put the fashionable gents of Jamaican subculture known as ‘Rudeboys’ front and center in an exhibition at Somerset House called “Return of the Rudeboy”. In 1960s Jamaica, “rudeboys” represented rebellious youth angry at unemployment and disenfranchisement (poverty, poor housing, lack of food) happening in Jamaican shantytowns. They were men sharply dressed in pork pie hats, mohair suits, freshly polished brogues, children of the ska music scene who were known for mincing words with law enforcement and disrupting through means of violence.

The Jamaican subculture found a subsequent home in England in the 1970s and 1980s, and, fast-forwarding a few decades, its cool has deepened in modern day England. The rudeboys (and gals) photographer Dean Chalkey’s ‘Return of the Rudeboy’ exhibition–curated by stylist and creative director Harris Eliott–reflect a modern rudeboy whose influence is less about disrupting and more about influencing music, fashion, art, technology and business. The term rudeboy has grown from being a slang term exclusive to one sect, to encompassing a lifestyle that is more inclusive to both men and women. Projecting ones individuality through style and attitude is the cornerstone. Rudeboys today in a sense have taken their style cues from their predecessors of cool, and have become the leading creatives and entrepreneurs.(via Washington Post)

All Photos by Dean Chalkey/Somerset House

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

I knew a shit tonne of ‘rude boys’ in my youth and out of those photos - the only guy close enough to a legit ‘rude boy’ is the third photo down … but he should really swap his fedora for a pork pie. The rest are just insanely smartly dressed gentlemen who look so fine (so does mister third shot).

(via tropicaltaint)